Reading and Carrying Cue Sheets

Reading and Carrying Cue Sheets

Reading Cue Sheets

Cue sheets are quite easy to read and use once you are acquainted with them. In an earlier post we shared an image of a typical cue sheet. On the left you will find cumulative mileage. On the right you will find information about the coming turn. The mileage and turn direction will be followed with information about the trail you are turning onto. Mileage is cumulative, not the distance between turns, but the distance from the start to the turn. When you finish one page you pull it out, stuff it in your jersey and move on to the next page.

Carrying Cue Sheets

Here is a simple example of a cue sheet holder. I’ve arrived at this iteration of carrying cue sheets after using several commercially available map holders of all shapes and sizes. This cue sheet holder works well for me, it is easy to make, and it is affordable. If you don’t want to make your own holder, this example might not be for you. There are many commercially available map holders that your local bike shop can access.

The base consists of a thin sheet of rigid plastic. I’ve cut it into a classic diamond kite like shape. Then I cut out a hole to fit it under my stem cap and four holes to zip-tie it to my handlebars. After securing it to my bicycle I simply super-glue a slide-lock Zip-loc freezer bag to the plastic sheet. It may look a little cheap, and it is, but this is the best functioning cue-sheet holder that I have discovered in the last few years racing self supported events.

Cue Sheet Holder.

The Slide-lock bag is key. It makes the cue sheets accessible while riding.

Cue Sheet Holder Attachment

I use thick foam tape under my holder to keep it flat and help secure it to the handlebar.

Cue Sheet Holder Attachment

The diamond shape maintains room for my knees while climbing and the top cap makes the holder plenty secure.